Podcast Season 2 Episode 1

Podcast

Title: Oleophobia

In this episode: Three quarters of the Linux kernel code is written by developers being paid to do so and Facebook transforms PHP performance. We promise to give up the command line for two weeks and ask whether Ubuntu is wrong to switch the default search engine in Firefox from Google to Yahoo. Plus, we introduce two new sections.

What's in the show

  • News: 75% of Linux code is now written by paid developers, according to kernel hacker Jonathan Corbet. Facebook rewrites PHP and what does Apple's iPad mean for Linux?
  • NEW SECTION! You Dare Us
  • Discovery of the week:
    • Graham: VST synths and audio effects can now be made Linux-native
    • Mike: Instant printed documentation with the 'card' command.
    • Paul: Generating command-lines with his own fantabulous TermBuilder
    • Andrew: Ubuntu's WordPress package shouldn't be packaged.
  • NEW SECTION! In the Hot Seat
  • Open Ballot: Ubuntu + Yahoo = evil?

  • Special offer: subscribe to Linux Format magazine and save up to to 55% - that's just $7.62 an issue!

Presenters: Andrew Gregory, Paul Hudson, Graham Morrison and Mike Saunders

Subscribe to the TuxRadar Podcast. Choose between Ogg Vorbis and MP3.

Music by Brad Sucks.

You should follow us on Identi.ca or Twitter


Your comments

Notes

I can't believe you guys kept the same music.

I don't know if you'll post a message for the Dares you want the community to come up with, but here's one: USE ONLY FREE SOFTWARE. Like RMS-labeled stuff. Swap to gNewSense if you have to.

I'm glad you guys are back; love the podcast.

Looking forward

Haven't listened to it yet but if the previous comment is correct then good on you for keeping the music :)

more

I real-time post comments as I listen!

A new hot seat topic would be audio formats (OGG Vorbis versus MP3, for example).

lxquick searches through about twelve different search engines at once. Google is not included, and Yahoo and Bing is. It doesn't save your searches or IP addresses. I've had mild success with it.

Typo

Glad this is back, I love the music, and somehow I'd missed the whole Facebook/PHP thang.
Also, you've got a type in the notes:
"own fantabulous Te*A*mBuilder"
should of course be TermBuilder.

Re: Typo

@BobTFish: Doh, sorry! Fixed.

I challenge you to---

1) Use only GNUStep for two weeks.
2) For two weeks use irb ( the interactive ruby interpreter ) as your commandline ( yes it can be done ) and as the language for any scripts you write.
3) For two weeks use some Common Lisp ( CLisp, CMUCL,SBCL ) for your commandline and scripting language.

PS: A regular expression builder, in general, is not possible. The problem being that in different contexts
the same string represents different regular expressions.
In some cases '(' represents the character and '\(' represents grouping, in other cases it is the opposite. Most
programming languages come with a regexp builder tool. Give it a string, enter a regexp and it highlights matches in the string so you can interactively build a regexp.

PPS: I understand there are meds that would help Mike Saunders with his Steve Jobs-envy.

dare

use gnash instead of adobe flash for 2 weeks

dare

use osx for 2 weeks

dare

use gnu hurd for 2 weeks

Ubuntu hating...

Sorry, I ought to mention that I have experience of running Ubuntu for about a year - I don't just hate it for the sake of hating it. Since 1999 I've run Debian, SuSE, Slackware, Ubuntu, and I'm now back with Debian. Ubuntu was the only distro that crashed. And I mean crashed, not just xorg freezing, but a pure and simple windows-style crash. Ugh... horrible mess of a 'distro'.

Ubuntu

I must say that I agree with Harvey. I use Mint which seems fairly robust except for some things. Those things all seem to originate from Ubuntu, including some things that crash my system.

It seems to me that Ubuntu is trying hard to provide an example of Gerald Weinberg's "White Bread Recipe Warning".

Two challenges and two suggestions

Hi!

Great podcast as always. I laughed a lot with you comments about the iPad.

Suggestions first:

1. This is for Paul. Please, talk CLOSER to the microphone!

2. Idea for a new segment: Linux and Free Software have got strong links with a wider movement that is Free Culture. Maybe you could add a segment about it where you could recommend songs, stories and videos with creative common licenses. Listeners could send you their own recommendations.

And now the challenges:

1. I don't know how it's your workflow. I suppose that involves a lot of email exchanges, texts, images, version control, etc. I don't have any clue about how you do it but I could bet that you only use regular e-mail clients and a clever directory structure. My challenge is that you install an online office like Feng Office, Group Office, Simple Groupware, phpGroupware or Tine 2.0 (It's your choice) and use it for manage your documents, communications, schedules, etc.

2. It's time for "Life on Mars" in Tuxradar! Or 1973 is back. I challenge you to use the same communications in your free time than in 1973 for a couple of weeks. That means no mobile phones, no Internet, no DVDs, no satellite TV, no CDs, etc. You can use land phones and pay phones (preferable in red phoneboxes). You can use radios and non digital TV (if possible) too.

Javier
PS. Sorry for the bad English

Challenge

How about switching the text editor? Emacs users switch to VI and vice versa, and maybe gedit and nano users could switch as well - or everyone uses a combination of echo, cat and sed...

Or how about having to use the Free Software Song (either sung by RMS or by Mike) as a startup sound - including on a laptop in public places?

My topic suggestions for that hot seat thing would be "GNU/" - with an emphasis on the "/".

And thanks for mentioning Crunchbang - love that distro and can't wait for an upgrade either!

I dare you ....

.... to use as your primary desktop/laptop for one week PC technology made before 1995 running any flavor of Linux you want. Older the better. No using the desktop as just a terminal to another machine. Applications and data need to be running and processing locally.

DrDrambuie

hot topic suggestion

On Jun 13th 2009 Chris DiBona of Google made a remarkable claim on the WhatWG mailing list:

"If [youtube] were to switch to theora and maintain even a semblance of the current youtube quality it would take up most available bandwidth across the Internet."

Given that Google has refused to offer the backing that Mozilla has to theora, should we use Firefox rather than Chrome as a gesture of support towards open standards? Remember that Google sided with Apple in refusing to sanction theora as the html5 <video> tag standard. If Google Chrome overtakes Firefox in market share then I see no prospect that theora will ever really take off. Another thing to consider is that, since it's aquisition of On2, Google is expected to come up with it's own video codecs. How would this affect things?

These are important issues - not just in relation to the web, but also because everyone admits that Video editing is one area where Linux lags behind other operating systems. Also, it is an increasingly important area to the average user, as I believe Ubuntu has recognised by deciding to include a Video editor by default for 10.04. If an open codec such as theora were to become the standard then I believe it would really help to push Video editing on Linux forwards.

Speaking for myself, if there was a video editor as good as iMovie for Linux and if Ardour was as easy to get working as on Mac I would never use OSX again. It has everything else I need. As far as I'm concerned, these are the only things holding it back and preventing it from being my sole OS.

Finally, while we're on the subject - is there a good GUI tool for ripping DVDs to theora in an ogg container? I am aware of Handbrake, but this results in files being in an mkv container which firefox cannot render. I have also used Thoggen which can give you a file in an ogg container, but this is ridiculously slow, even on my QuadCore Machine and to be honest, in my experience, the quality is poor and does not compare to that of handbrake.

theora

A problem I've encountered with theora is that, although I want to use it to support open codecs, it can be very difficult to do so. Try as I might, I have not been able to find an PMP which supports theora. Even vendors like Cowon, whose products always play vorbis and flac, don't, as far as I can tell have anything that plays theora - instead you have to use avi, wmv or asf - that is a real shame.

I dare you

To include the "One more thing" in the rest of the season

dare

listen to robson & jerome's greatest hits non-stop for 2 weeks

Here is my dare!

All non-programmers try to learn programming (with any language) and make a graphical application to read text files and write text!

Then see who comes up with the best one. :)

Also Set the deadline for 2 months... the person with the better app wins two pints of his favourite drink! :D

I dare you to...

1) Only use the command line for a fortnight, absolutely no GUI not even for web browsing

2) Switch to using OpenSolaris or a BSD for a fortnight

3) Crowdsource the content of one episode of the podcast

I challenge you to...

I challenge you to... use Warty Warthog and nothing else. Then tell us how far Ubuntu and Linux has come in the last 5 years.

Dirac?

yes a hot topic issue - should we strive to use theora or is it doomed to failure and subsequently a waste of time and effort? I don't want to spend lots of time converting my videos to a format that will become obsolete. Would Dirac be a better option? Are there any decent GUI tools for converting/ripping to Dirac? I realise there are legal issues regarding commercial movies etc., but there are some of us who have homemade content on DVD and are struggling to find ways to convert these to open formats. Besides similar legal issues exist regarding CD ripping software and the possibility to use such software to break copyright laws, yet all the distros include such tools by default. For the amateur filmmaking hobbyist it seems like an uphill struggle to support open formats as much as I would like to. Will h.264 win? Has it done so already? What about Bluray? Do we/will we ever have bluray support or an open alternative for HD content? Unsure about these things myself. Would like to know what people think.

theora debate

"Anyway, if Apple (+Nokia) and maybe Microsoft decide not to use Theora then using theora in FF or Opera is basically useless. Whole point of video-element was to have one way of doing things. Atm it looks like Opera and Mozilla are on their own and that doesn't fix the web. Actually is just causes more fragmentation."

Not my words but a comment I came across in the Ubuntu forums. What do people think?

re. theora

Chris DiBona says it's not practical for Youtube to use theora. Funny him saying that because Wikipedia and Dailymotion don't seem to have had any problems or reluctance in transitioning to theora. Wonder if the real reason that Youtube are not supporting theora is that Google have their own codec in the works (Google having bought On2). Also, the new version of theora ("Thusnelda") addresses some of the quality issues that theora has been criticised for. Not sure how Dirac compares, though would like to try it out, having heard good things about it. Can't seem to find an option in OggConvert to convert to Dirac in Karmic. Also curious to hear people's thoughts on which is the best Linux Video editor at the moment and the decision to include Pitivi in the default Ubuntu install. I know many seem to prefer Openshot and I must admit I have had a bit more joy with it than with Pitivi although neither has proved satisfying to me so far, unfortunately. Hopefully, including a video editor by default in the most popular distro will help push development along in this area. I think most would agree that a really good reliable Videoeditor to compare with something like iMovie is the missing link at present, as far as Linux is concerned. Maybe Canonical or Novell should get Edward Hervey, Johnathan Thomas or other people who understand video on the payroll, so they can develop this stuff fulltime. It would be a sound investment, because it is the lack of functionality in this area which is preventing people from switching to Linux, I feel.

Living the life of Richard

Living the life of Richard Stallman sounds like a great challenge, you probably wouldn't be allowed to even use Firefox since its proprietary logo.

On an another note, I'd like to see TuxRadar's take on why EU keeps bugging Microsoft about irrelevant matters about default browser and media player, when they don't do anything about the real anti-competitive practices of Microsoft forcing vendors to bundle Windows on all systems or pay the ridiculously high non-OEM prices, which really isn't an option if you want to make money.

Challenge: Gnome Do

After Paul's (?) Discovery of the Week/Fortnight/Month/Millenia last year my shift to LINUX was complete. I was a big OS X user (from Windows XP), and had a love affair with Quicksilver. I've always been a keyboard/hotkey user and with Gnome Do and a well configured Compiz, LINUX lends itself to that well. Here's the challenge"

'As far as humanly possible, use only the keyboard with hotkeys, tab and Gnome Do. No terminal allowed.'

Why don't you tally each time you use the mouse and the one with the least tally marks wins.

One last thing, the one with the most tallys has to sing the Brad Sucks song on the next podcast!

Hmmm, regardless of whether you choose this challenge, make that the forfeit for whatever challenge you do choose. I bet Mike's a crooner.

video editing

the vlc team are making a video editor - VLMC (Video Lan Movie Creator). Hopefully this could be the end of my video editing woe.

Challenge Suggestion

Here is an idea for a possible challenge:
Why don't you try to investigate the state of encryption on linux?
Namely encrypted hard drives, encrypted partitions, encrypted files, & encrypted emails (pgp signatures and signing), and encrypted protocols (VPN tunneling).

It's the first sign of the apocalypse!

First of all, great new podcast, I got a bit bored of the last few of the previous series but this new one filled me with hope (that probably won't be fulfilled :p)

Now onto the main point of my message - PulseAudio actually fixed something for once rather than breaking it! Doom is coming! On my netbook* (this is the only system I've seen with this exact problem; from the Internet, others have the same symptoms but different causes), presumably caused by an obscure bug in my sound driver that I can't be bothered to find or even report, Phonon (and ONLY Phonon, nothing else) will occasionally think it is broken and refuse to play sound through it, even though it very much works - this is more likely to happen if I had it on mute at one point for some reason, but it can be seen even when not on mute. In these situations, KDE tries to fall back to PulseAudio, which is very odd as that daemon isn't installed by default by Kubuntu. So, after getting fed up of having to restart in order to use Kaffeine (which they should have kept as a KDE3 app, by the way), I checked on the Internet, and finding no solutions (they all involved installing packages I already have or removing packages I didn't have in the first place), I decided on a whim to install PulseAudio, and reboot. And what do you know, Phonon now works perfectly every time - although the messages about my sound card not working still appear, it actually has something that works it can fall back to whilst it has time to "realise" that the sound card is in fact working perfectly!

*Acer Aspire One ZG5 with Intel Corporation 82801G (ICH7 Family) High Definition Audio Controller [8086:27d8] (rev 02)

Challenge and comments on podcast

Thanks for the new podcast, the start of Season 2. I enjoyed it and I'm glad you kept the same music.

For the challenge for 2 weeks: Your mission, if you decide to accept it, is to use Linux video editing software to create a video to upload to YouTube to promote using Linux.

As another poster wrote here, video editing in Linux is not that great. I sometimes use Open Shot video editor in Ubuntu for simple video editing. ALL the other video editors I tried in Linux either did not work or were too difficult to get started with (such as no timeline visible). For more serious stuff I still use Sony Vegas 6 which I bought some years ago, running in Windows XP in a virtual machine in VirtualBox. I think the guy behind Open Shot should get some backing from somewhere, his program shows potential and is easy to use -- it's just a pity it keep crashing and is thus only suitable for small video projects.

Love your Podcast!

.

A Dare/Challenge

Live the future like of chrome OS.

Use only your chrome browser, which means all needs (except for those you can't help, like recording the podcast) must be online apps, and you must use as many google provided ones as possible. Gmail, Google docs, Picassa Web, etc.. Also, you must use your Ubuntu One space or other cloud space as much as possible instead of your HD. You are allowed to move files to the cloud before you begin though.

I think a challenge like this will allow you guys to discover not only some of the best web apps out there, because you will have no choice, but also what the web still lacks for good apps.

One Minute Hot Seat

THE FSF SONG!

Double dog dare you

to keep doing one more thing the rest of the season!

Dare / Challenge

You have 2 weeks to create a new theme tune for the Tuxradar Podcast using Open Source tools exclusively eg. Ardour, Hydrogen, Rosegarden etc.

PS. How about some video tutorials. Somethings are easier to pick up if you can actually see them being done rather than having them explained to you in words. I think this is especially the case for multimedia where reading about something is no substitute for actually hearing/seeing it. The Challenge I have set you could be the basis of a series of video tutorials on how to use various audio tools in Linux. You could have a similar series for video editing and one for graphic editing and one for office software, one for mythbuntu, one for how the magazine is produced etc. The online Video tutorial series "Meet The Gimp" is really fantastic and Richard Querin's Inkscape tutorials site also. I don't believe that I am the only one who wishes there were similar projects exploring other programs. I know there is stuff on Youtube, but most of these videos are merely short introductions and only scratch the surface rather than continually adding new material to build upon what has previously been covered and progress to how to use more advanced features.

for 'in the hot seat' how

for 'in the hot seat'
how about whenever you hesitate deviate or repeat a word, someone else takes over,

:)

On interviews.

First, thank you for a great podcast!

Just wanted to chip in and say:
Yes! Would love to hear interviews on the show!

Just my two-yens.

/Anonymous Hippopotamus from Tokyo

Badgers and roof

dachs=badger
dach=roof

Have any serious mention of Annodex

Has anyone here heard of "Annodex" at all? Something I remember from a lug meet a couple of years ago - don't know how it is going but if I recall, it sounded like "the Sh*t" - sorry for swearing, but I really think it had great promise.

Maybe someone could try looking up Annodex and see how far it has come since then.

Oh, yeah, and I have recently tried putting Msys onto my other computer, a posix environment for GCC inside windows XP without having to virtualise ... what does everyone think of this particular cross compiling arena?

Has anyone tried actually working it into something really ground shattering? For example getting Enlightenment compiled on a windows machine to work and then creating - say - an RPM for a linux box?

Before you laugh too much, you should consider: getting a compile of a windowing system that you could then actually run in the other partition which has been holding linux but you just haven't used very much. It might be an interesting way to cross pollinise people's interest.

I fear it would be a little too tricky for newbies, but might be an interesting way to get the doubters to attempt something mildly heroic?

What do you reckon?
Mike in Bankstown

Have any serious mention of Annodex

Has anyone here heard of "Annodex" at all? Something I remember from a lug meet a couple of years ago - don't know how it is going but if I recall, it sounded like "the Sh*t" - sorry for swearing, but I really think it had great promise.

Maybe someone could try looking up Annodex and see how far it has come since then.

Oh, yeah, and I have recently tried putting Msys onto my other computer, a posix environment for GCC inside windows XP without having to virtualise ... what does everyone think of this particular cross compiling arena?

Has anyone tried actually working it into something really ground shattering? For example getting Enlightenment compiled on a windows machine to work and then creating - say - an RPM for a linux box?

Before you laugh too much, you should consider: getting a compile of a windowing system that you could then actually run in the other partition which has been holding linux but you just haven't used very much. It might be an interesting way to cross pollinise people's interest.

I fear it would be a little too tricky for newbies, but might be an interesting way to get the doubters to attempt something mildly heroic?

What do you reckon?
Mike in Bankstown

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